The silencing of the media

In my blog of 25 September ‘Defending journalism in Turkey’ I described the interview I gave with Ugur Güç, TGS president, on an evening news programme on IMC TV. We discussed the increasing number of prosecutions against journalists and during the interview presenter Banu Güven, mentioned  that their television station had been threatened with closure. Within two weeks the station had been taken off air, their equipment seized and the journalists and other media and support workers joined the growing numbers of unemployed, reported on the EFJ web site at 2,500 – see http://europeanjournalists.org/blog/2016/10/24/turkey-107-journalists-in-prison-and-2500-others-left-unemployed/ of 24 October. Recently I received an eye witness account of the raid leading up to the closure of IMC TV which is reproduced below:

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After all this time – it’s IMPRESS

The Press Recognition Panel (PRP), established by Parliament following the Leveson report published in November 2012, has approved IMPRESS’s application for recognition under the Royal Charter. Meeting on Tuesday in west London |(opposite the BBC) the Panel considered line by line whether the press regulator met the criteria set out in the Charter. After nearly five hours of consideration, witnessed by dozens of members of the public (including myself for the morning session) and transmitted live on the Internet, the panel decided that it did.

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More trials pile up

The next day (Wednesday 21 September) we arrived at the Caglayan Court of Justice in Istanbul which was hearing 5 different prosecution cases against journalists. We were originally told that there would only be one! Again we were with the IFJ/EFJ affiliates TGS (Journalists Union of Turkey), DISK-Basin-Is (Journalists Union of Turkey from DISK) and TGC (Journalists Association of Turkey) to observe the following cases:

The first was the appeal in the MIT Trucks case where journalists Can Dündar and Erdem Gül working for Cumhuriyet newspaper had been sentenced to 5 years in jail for revealing state secrets and arms trafficking between Turkish intelligence services (MIT) and Syrian armed rebel groups. The appeal hearing was held in secret but this did not put off the many supporters, including Can’s wife, who turned up to the court. Can was not present as he is currently living in Germany (see my 16 August blog) and has said that he will not consider returning until after the state of emergency has been lifted. A further hearing has been ordered. Continue reading More trials pile up